Metropolitan Museum of Art Accessory Writing Instruments

 

chagall-web

NEW! Louis Comfort Tiffany Magnolias and Irises

MM/1660/TMI
A master of many media, Louis Comfort Tiffany (American, 1848―1933) was one of America’s most noted decorative artists at the turn of the century.  He began his career as a painter but moved quickly to interior decoration and leaded-glass windows, creating innovative types of opalescent glass in vibrant hues.  In his Magnolias and Irises leaded-glass window (ca. 1908), designed as a memorial to the Frank family of New York, delicately rendered irises and magnolia blossoms frame a distant, winding river.

Ball pen twists to open and close and takes a standard ballpoint refill.

 

monet-web

NEW! Claude Monet Sunflowers

MM/1440/MSF
Claude Monet (French, 1840―1926) has long been regarded as the Impressionist par excellence.  For more than sixty years, he strove to capture the nuanced richness of the world around him in vibrant canvases that explore the changing quality of color and light at different times of the day and in various weather conditions.

The sunflowers harvested for the lush bouquet featured on this pen grew flanking the steps that led down to Monet’s garden at Vétheuil.  He exhibited this painting, now in the Museum’s collection, in 1882 at the seventh Impressionist exhibition, where the “brio and daring” of his technique elicited the critic’s admiration.  
Ball pen twists to open and close and takes a standard ballpoint refill.

vangogh-REVISED-web

NEW! Van Gogh Irises

MM/1550/VGI

Vincent Van Gogh (Dutch, 1853―1890), the eldest son of a Dutch Reformed minister and a bookseller’s daughter, pursued various vocations, including that of an art dealer and clergyman, before deciding to become an artist at the age of twenty-seven.  Over the course of his decade-long career (1880―90), he produced nearly 900 painting and more than 1,100 works on paper.  Van Gogh painted the irises reproduced on this pen near the end of his long stay at the asylum in Saint-Rémy.
Ball pen twists to open and close and takes a standard ballpoint refill.

 

met-shoe

 Shoes Ball Pen

MM/1202/SH
For stepping out in style, this pen is a shoe-in. From the Museum’s fabled Costume Institute come images of some of the eye-catching designs for the last century’s well-shod foot. If the shoe fits—and all of these do splendidly, in your hand.
Ball pen twists to open and close and takes a standard ballpoint refill.

 

 

Meissen-pen

 18th-Century German Ball Pen

MM/1222/MF
Germany’s Meissen factory was the first in Europe to produce hard-paste porcelain. Meissen and other European manufacturers of the eighteenth century often looked to the more experienced Japanese, borrowing their Kakiemon porcelain designs. The flowers on this pen are in the Kakiemon style and are found on one of the Metropolitan’s grand Meissen vases, which stands nearly two feet high. These flowers, by contrast, will sit comfortably in your hand.
Ball pen twists to open and close and takes a standard ballpoint refill.

 

 

Mughal-pen

 Mughal Carpet Ball Pen

MM/1322/MC
From 1526 to 1858, India celebrated some of its greatest cultural achievements. This was the time of the Mughal Empire, and among its artistic artifacts were many fine carpets. The most magical of all in the Museum’s collection is the one whose seventeenth-century design cloaks this pen. The center field design reveals an oft-found Persian influence, but the borders on either end are distinctly Indian.
Ball pen twists to open and close and takes a standard ballpoint refill.

 

 

 

Klimt-pen

 

 Klimt Ball Pen

MM/1402/KVW
The Austrian painter Gustav Klimt (1862-1918) may be best known for his arresting paintings and murals, but he was also proficient on another canvas. Klimt was part of the Wiener Werkstätte, or Vienna Workshops, that produced woven and printed textiles. This image is one of the latter, which Klimt designed around 19XX, and which is now in the Museum’s collections. The barrel of this pen fairly pulsates with Klimt’s kinetic swirls and elongations of color. Be prepared to experience creative sparks as you write!
Ball pen twists to open and close and takes a standard ballpoint refill.

 

 

 peacock-feathers-pen  

Louis Comfort Tiffany Peacock Feather Ball Pen

MM/1422/PF
It was yet another feather in the hat of America’s Louis Comfort Tiffany (1848-1933) when he developed a technique for turning molten glass of different colors into shimmering columns of iridescence. He called it Favrile glass, borrowing from the Old English fabrile, meaning “hand wrought.” Peacock feathers, with their expressive “eyes,” were a natural for articulating this luminosity. These feathers can be found on one of the Museum’s Favrile glass vases. From there it was a natural migration to this pen.
Ball pen twists to open and close and takes a standard ballpoint refill.

 

 decco-pen  

Deco Flowers Ball Pen

MM/1502/DFL
Bold bursts of color blossom on this ballpoint. Its flourishes are plucked from a detail of a textile design by Edouard Bénedictus that’s found in his Variations of 1924, a copy of which is in the Museum’s collection. The artist Jean Saudé infused these Art Deco designs with their brilliant colors. When you hold it, it’s as if you are holding an exuberant garden party.
Ball pen twists to open and close and takes a standard ballpoint refill.

 desky-pen  

Deskey Ball Pen

MM/1702/DSK
Although Art Deco reached its zenith in the 1930s, its iconic bold styling, simplified lines and sensuous curves hold a timeless appeal. True to its form, even the name is a distillation. “Art Deco” is derived from Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes, the 1925 design fair held in Paris.

American designers embraced the bold simplicity of Art Deco. Donald Deskey (1894-1989), a Minnesota-born industrial, graphic and interior designer, fashioned the Art Deco cigarette box whose design inspired this pen’s. That was in 1928. Four years later, he would bring the design aesthetic to the interior of another icon with timeless appeal: Radio City Music Hall.
Ball pen twists to open and close and takes a standard ballpoint refill.

 egyptian-ceiling-pen  

Egyptian Ceiling Ball Pen

MM/1802/EGY
Across the Nile from today’s Luxor, in the cemeteries of western Thebes, the ancient tombs of Egypt hold an unexpected treasure: colorfully painted ceilings. Fast forward from 1360-1349 B.C. to A.D. 1907-1937, when members of the Metropolitan’s Egyptian Expedition made facsimiles of many of these. (You can see 365 of them in our Egyptian galleries.) This pattern and its surprising color palette is one such painted ceiling.
Ball pen twists to open and close and takes a standard ballpoint refill.

 Iznik-Tile-pen  

Iznik Tile Ball Pen

MM/1822/IZT
He was Süleyman the Magnificent, an Ottoman sultan, and in the sixteenth century he put a small town in northwestern Turkey on the cultural map. Iznik became one of the Middle East’s most important centers for ceramics. A brilliant tile from that place and time is in the Museum’s collection, and its design is re-created on this pen. Against a vibrant white background the blues and reds connect in beautiful patterns—an ancient tile with timeless appeal.
Ball pen twists to open and close and takes a standard ballpoint refill.

 William-Morris-Compton-pen  

William Morris Compton Ball Pen

MM/1902/WMC
Long before wallpaper meant the background on a computer screen, the British designer William Morris (1834-1896) was creating some of the most eye-catching wallpapers of the Victorian era. Morris blurred the distinction between fine and decorative arts, with his firm turning out designs that still captivate the eye. This one, called Compton, is from 1896 and shows the customary Morris profusion of flowers, leaves and fruit.
Ball pen twists to open and close and takes a standard ballpoint refill.

 Parisian-Patchwork  

Persian Patchwork 

MM/1662/PP
To say this pen is pure poetry is to reveal its noble history. The images are taken from the Museum’s lavishly illustrated Shahnama, or Book of Kings, an epic poem penned in the eleventh century. The poem tells the story of Persia’s ancient kings, and the book in which it is written is fit for royalty. More than 250 paintings fill its folios. We have taken details from some of the most exquisite of them and created a patchwork of images to grace this pen.
Ball pen twists to open and close and takes a standard ballpoint refill.

 Golden-Bamboo  

Golden Bamboo

MM/1992/JN
The inspiration for this pen was found in an elegant lacquer box, ca. 1800, that is among the decorative arts in the Museum’s holdings. Powdered gold and silver were combined with the lacquer to give the box a delicate tone. The Japanese technique for achieving this effect is known as maki-e. Our pen re-creates the same bamboo design found on the box. Fittingly, bamboo itself is one of the earliest known writing surfaces.
Ball pen twists to open and close and takes a standard ballpoint refill.

 butterfly

Qing Butterfly Ball Pen 

MM/1722/QBY
The butterflies on this colorful pen are adapted from an early nineteenth-century coverlet in the Museum’s collection, made in China for the American market (probably Canton, ca.  1830).  Skillfully embroidered in polychrome silks, the crimson silk coverlet features a field of varied butterflies fluttering around a basket of flowers, deep borders of garden scenes, and a fringe on all four sides.  East Asian artists through the ages have been inspired by the eye-catching color combinations of butterfly wings to create distinctive compositions.  
Ball pen twists to open and close and takes a standard ballpoint refill.
 lotus

Lotus Ball Pen 

MM/1622/LTS
This pen design features a detail from a Japanese painted handscroll (Kamakura period, 1185–1333) in the Museum’s collection, which illustrates episodes taken from chapter 25, the “Universal Gate” chapter, of the Lotus Sutra. This popular text describes the manifold mercies of the compassionate bodhisattva Kannon, the most beloved bodhisattva in East Asia. Although the compositions and many motifs of this version reflect Chinese pictorial traditions, it is clear that the artist inventively incorporated native Japanese (yamato-e) elements.
Ball Pen twists to open and close and takes a standard ballpoint refill.
 MM-1602-AL  

Astral Ball Pen

MM/1602/ASM
Astronomicum Caesareum, one of the most sumptuous of all Renaissance instructive manuals, explains the use of the astrolabe (for calculating the altitude of stars) and other instruments used for computing planetary positions.  The author, court astronomer to Emperor Charles V, also provided new observations on the comet of 1531 (Halley’s Comet).  Only about forty copies of this work survive, one in the Metropolitan Museum.  This pen is based on hand-colored woodcuts in the original work.

 

 

back-button